Siren Nurse Spotlight of Gabe Gallardo, LPN

Siren Nurse Spotlight: Gabe Gallardo, LPN

June 10, 2021

Gabe is a licensed practical nurse (LPN) who has experience working with at-risk populations. He previously oversaw and managed adult populations with substance abuse disorders. Gabe has a background in assisting Medicaid and Medicare members and has a detailed understanding of those patient populations and the ever-changing policies that they are subject to. Gabe resides in Salt Lake City, Utah with his wife and their German Shepherd. He enjoys traveling and spending time with friends and family.

"Siren Socks detected an issue on a patient's foot during her first month of wear. She had an ulcer, which could have led to serious complications. I notified her doctor right away, who was able to save the toe before it became infected."

Gabe became a nurse in order to make a difference in people's lives and to take on new challenges. He shares, "It is a privilege to be a nurse; nothing motivates me more than knowing that I’m making an impact in my patients' lives. My profession can be very challenging at times but it’s an honor to help take care of those in need."
Reflecting on his current role, Gabe says, "I enjoy being a Siren nurse because our team is incredibly supportive. We all want to see each other—as well as our patients—succeed. Everyone at Siren is focused on the same mission: to help diabetic foot patients get the best quality of care. It's exciting to be part of a team that is innovating in healthcare and technology for the benefit of helping others."

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

Interested patients can find a Siren-Certified Provider near them and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

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Marc’s Diabetic Feet Beat Part 2: My Introduction to Diabetes

June 7, 2021

My Introduction to Diabetes

Foot fractures, ulcers, neuropathy and Charcot are not unique to diabetes. They are also not the only serious complications associated with the disease. In addition to foot problems, diabetes is a principal cause of kidney failure, high blood pressure, muscle fatigue, heart disease, stroke and loss of vision. Given my forty-year struggle with the disease, I am relatively fortunate. In addition to the problems that have threatened the loss of my left foot, I have Stage III (moderate) kidney disease, but have been spared serious heart and vision problems. My kidney function and condition of my feet were normal before I became diabetic. Both conditions worsened during the period that I recklessly failed to acknowledge the seriousness of the disease. However, as I discuss in later installments of my blog, over the last ten years, my kidney function stabilized and the incidence and severity of my foot problems improved through a combination of diligent glucose monitoring, comprehensive medical treatment and advanced technology. Had I continued along the path I had followed earlier, I would almost certainly be footless, on dialysis and possibly blind or -- worse, dead. My effort to help my readers preserve their limbs and avoid the other vicious complications of diabetes necessarily begins with a discussion of my experiences with the disease itself.

Diabetes Defined

There are two types of diabetes: Type I, sometimes referred to as “childhood” diabetes, and Type II, or “adult-onset” diabetes”. Broadly speaking, Type I diabetes is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by the inability of the pancreas to produce insulin in sufficient quantities to convert sugar to energy, while Type II is a disease in which excess body fat, poor diet, inadequate exercise and age interfere with the ability of the body’s cells to process the insulin the pancreas produces. Type I generally requires injections of insulin to replace the body’s natural production, while Type II can often be controlled with dietary changes, weight loss, increased activity and various oral medication. In severe cases, insulin injections may also be necessary. The causes of Type I diabetes have not been firmly determined but are thought to result from both genetic and environmental factors and/or a virus.

My Life Before Diabetes

I was a chubby kid and loved to eat. (That hasn’t changed). My first thirty-six years were marked by a repeated sequence of heavy eating and binge dieting. See a pizza, devour it! See an attractive girl, diet! My dieting was uniformly motivated by vanity rather than health. My life in athletics was likewise wanting. My caring parents tried to interest me in athletics, to no avail: swimming, boxing, little league baseball, even Judo. (Judo was short-lived. At age eight, I threw my father across the living room and sprained his back). My parents then sent me to an athletic day camp. My only “A” was in eating lunch. Really!
When I entered high school, I was 220 pounds. I stopped eating and lost 40 pounds. By the time I graduated, I was back to 220. When I was 26, I topped out at 308 pounds. I went to a “bariatric specialist”, who gave me daily injections of human chorionic gonadatropin (“HCG”, since banned by the FDA) derived from the urine of pregnant women. The injections, along with a 600 calorie/day diet consisting of a three-ounce portion of boiled chicken or fish and an undressed salad twice daily, enabled me to lose 140 pounds in six months. After fluctuating within a 20 to 30-pound range over a ten-year period, I crept back to 240. I enrolled in a hospital-supervised “protein sparing” fast, consisting of six 100-calorie protein powder shakes a day, weekly blood tests and group “behavioral modification” sessions. The week before I started, I noticed that I was consuming large amounts of water, followed by excessive urination: unbeknownst to me at the time, a common symptom and precursor of diabetes. During my first visit to the weight clinic, the doctor casually told me that he assumed I was on the diet to treat my diabetes. Diabetes?!! What diabetes??! My blood sugar registered 306 (normal is 80-110).

Prior to age 36, my health was generally unremarkable and periodic blood glucose readings were normal. Alarmed by the diagnosis, I promptly consulted with my internist. Given my biological age, weighty eating habits and athletic deficiencies, he concluded that I had Type II diabetes. He suggested that I remain on the weight loss program and monitor my blood glucose. After three months and a 25-pound loss, my glucose levels returned to normal. Unfortunately, the success was short-lived. A few months later, my glucose readings spiked. The doctor prescribed Metformin, a still-used diabetic control medication invented in 1922. The medication failed to work. I consulted an endocrinologist, who reviewed my history and concluded that I was a (late-blooming, I guess) Type I diabetic. (He referred to the brief period that my blood sugars were normal following the diet as a “honeymoon period”, a common but fleeting condition following rapid weight loss at the onset of diabetes). Interestingly, there is no history of the disease in my family and no doctor has ever been able to account for why I got it. Although it is uninformed by anything I have heard or read on the subject, my theory is that my protracted history of binge eating and starvation diets taxed my pancreas to the point that it was no longer able to produce insulin.

Next time: Careless behavior produces bad outcomes

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

Interested patients can find a Siren-Certified Provider near them and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

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Nurse Spotlight Raelene Ramirez LPN

Nurse Spotlight: Raelene Ramirez, LPN

June 3, 2021

Raelene is an LVN with a medical background of 4 years. She has experience on medical surgical units, where she worked closely with disabled veterans. Raelene has also cared for the geriatric population as a charge nurse in a skilled nursing and rehab facility. She is known for her compassion and dedication to her patients. A true team player, Raelene is always ready and eager to learn. She recently moved to San Antonio with her family and enjoys outdoors activities, as well as playing musical instruments.

"I was on the phone with a new patient who told me right away how much he enjoys wearing Siren Socks—that they are the most comfortable socks he's ever worn and he appreciates that they help ensure his feet are healthy. This is how I know we're doing right by our patients!"

Raelene has worked with many different patients in a variety of settings. Her experiences have shown her the powerful impact that preventative measures can have in the quality of life of patients. She shares, "To hear my patients say that they appreciate their Siren Nurse brings me joy. I was once providing post-op care for patients with amputations. To be a part of a team that provides preventative measures reminds me every day of how much we truly do make a difference and save lives."

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

Interested patients can find a Siren-Certified Provider near them and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

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Provider Spotlight – LaWanna Monday Harden, DPM, Lithonia, GA

May 23, 2021

Dr. Monday-Harden is a native of Eatonton, Georgia. She graduated with honors from Putnam County High School earning a four-year basketball scholarship to Augusta State University where she received a B.S. in Biology. She graduated at the top of her class and earned the distinction of the university’s all-time leading scorer in women’s basketball. Dr. Monday-Harden earned her doctorate at Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine where she received the Samuel N. Ulevitch Dermatologic Award for her academic achievements. She completed a three-year surgical residency at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Decatur, GA serving as Chief Resident in her final year. She is currently a surgical instructor for podiatric residents at the Atlanta Center for Foot and Ankle Surgery in Sandy Springs.

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Dr. Monday-Harden’s special interests are advanced diabetic limb salvage and sports medicine. As a sports enthusiast involved in running and basketball, she understands the foot and ankle healthcare concerns of athletes and active adults. She is an active lecturer and podiatric resource for hospital-based Diabetic Resource Centers in the metro Atlanta area. In addition to being a dedicated physician to her patients, Dr. Monday-Harden is married and the mother of two young sons. She and her family currently reside in Covington.

Interested patients can learn about Dr. Monday-Harden's approach with Siren Socks and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

Interested patients can find a Siren-Certified Provider near them and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

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Brenda Prentiss LPN

Nurse Spotlight: Brenda Prentiss, LPN

May 20, 2021

Brenda Prentiss is an LVN with over seven years of experience. She started her medical career as a CNA/unit secretary and quickly learned she was meant to do nursing. Her background includes family medicine, internal medicine, UC, physical therapy, and most recently chronic care management. She resides in Royse City, Texas with her fiancé and his 17-year-old sister. In her spare time Brenda loves woodworking and other crafts. She is excited to be a part of Siren and looks forward to helping as many patients as possible!

"One of my patients was suffering unbearable pain. I helped get her doctor's appointment rescheduled a week earlier by sending the provider pictures and a detailed description of the patient's symptoms. Her gratitude embodies why I love this job!"

One of Brenda's inspirations for becoming a nurse was Jane Delano, an early pioneer of the profession who founded the American Red Cross Nursing Service in the early 1900s. Brenda's favorite quote of Delano's is, "Nursing is not alone caring for the sick, the prevention of infection often constitutes as important a duty as the actual care of the patient. A woman who is without knowledge of the principles which should guide the performance of her work holds in her hands a capacity for doing infinite harm; she cannot avoid dangers in which she does not recognize."

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

Interested patients can find a Siren-Certified Provider near them and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

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Marc’s Diabetic Feet Beat Part 1: The Saga of my Left Foot

May 17, 2021

The (so far, Continuing) Saga of My Left Foot

This is the first installment of ---what I hope to be ---the continuing saga of my left foot. It is a saga because it stretches back some forty years to when I first learned that I was suffering from Type 1 Diabetes; and I hope to continue writing about it so long as: (i) my foot remains attached to my body and (ii) my story is able to provide some useful insights in successfully dealing with one of the potentially most serious but, with proper care and treatment, mostly preventable, consequences of diabetes mellitus—the loss of a limb.

Who am I?

First, a brief introduction. I was first diagnosed with Type I diabetes in my mid 30’s. For more than twenty years thereafter, I basically ignored the advice of my endocrinologist and dietitian(s), refusing to alter my carb-laden diet in favor of simply eating what I wished and compensating with excessive and somewhat arbitrary insulin injections. I visited podiatrists mostly after problems occurred rather than seeing them on a consistent schedule and taking prophylactic measures to prevent them. I pranced around in bare feet and chose my footwear based on style rather than suitability. After problems developed, I sought medical advice without adequate investigation or research. In short, I was reckless, and I paid dearly for it. I hope to save my readers from a similar fate.

I am a slightly overweight, if not morbidly obese, 70+ year-old, mostly retired, lawyer. This is important, not because I want to impress you that I have a law degree, but because I want to be certain that you understand that I do not have a medical degree. The thoughts, observations and comments that I will be sharing with you are based on my nearly forty years of real life experience as a diabetic, which although informed by an abundance of dealings with an ever-changing cast of endocrinologists, podiatrists, surgeons, wound care specialists, orthotists and sundry other specialists in diabetic foot care, and aided by my own independent research and one unfortunate malpractice case, are neither intended to be nor should be taken as medical advice. At most, I hope to be able to provide those who choose to follow my blog with guidance on when and to seek competent medical advice—as well as on the steps that may be taken to minimize the need for it. I will also highlight some of the medical and technological advances that have taken place in the recent past that assist in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot disease that were unavailable during the early years of my struggles to save my foot.

What’s up with my foot?

This is a recent x-ray and picture of my left foot:

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(For reasons that a not entirely clear, my left foot has suffered most of the complications caused by diabetic neuropathy, including recurrent ulcers, hairline fractures, displaced fractures, a Charcot foot collapse, two (and potentially a third) reconstructive surgeries and ongoing ulcerations. Apart from sharing the daily incidence of incessant neuropathic foot pain with its partner on the left, my right foot is a near-perfect piece of anatomy suitable for placement in a Ferragamo ad in GQ. Unfortunately, shoes are typically sold in pairs). Had I only known earlier what I have learned through experience and hope to impart to others through this blog many of these problems could have been avoided.

What can I do for you?

My objective in taking on this project is to look back over by four decades of my experience dealing with the ravages of diabetes and highlight the steps that I might have taken to avoid the loss or, at least minimize the damage that impairs the usefulness of my foot and quality of my life. These include tips on monitoring and managing diabetes, daily foot care and preventative measures, podiatric treatment and advice, the benefits and options of reconstructive surgery and diabetic wound care. My hope is to deliver my message in a way that it not only informative but also practical and even entertaining.

What’s next?

In the next installment of my blog, I will describe the background and early years of my experience with diabetes in hopes you will be able to benefit from my recklessness and mistakes – and ward off the resultant complications.

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

Interested patients can find a Siren-Certified Provider near them and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

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Provider Spotlight – Carolyn McAloon, DPM, Castro Valley, CA

May 10, 2021

Carolyn McAloon, DPM, is a board-certified podiatrist at the Castro Valley and Pleasanton, California, locations of Bay Area Foot Care. She is also a fellow of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons and a passionate care provider. Patients and colleagues alike note her continuous pursuit of improvements in the modes and quality of care that she provides.

Dr. McAloon completed requirements for the pre-medicine program and earned her Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. She uses her background in psychology to provide compassionate, understanding attention to her patients.

After finishing her undergraduate education in 1991, she attended the California School of Podiatric Medicine at Samuel Merritt University in Oakland. She went on to complete surgical training with a residency at the Veteran’s Hospital in Palo Alto, California.

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Soon after finishing her formal education and training, Dr. McAloon started working in private practice in Castro Valley and opened a second location in Dublin, California, in 2008. From 2014-2015, she served as president of the California Podiatric Medical Association.

Today, she continues to use her expertise to advance the next generation of podiatrists. She mentors pre-med students and podiatric medical students at the California School of Podiatric Medicine.

Dr. McAloon’s dedication to her work is clear. Her main objective is to help patients live an active lifestyle and overcome the foot pain that’s holding them back.

Interested patients can learn about Dr. McAloon's approach with Siren Socks and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

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Temperature Monitoring for Diabetic Foot Care is the Gold Standard

May 7, 2021

Remote patient monitoring (RPM) has brought to light a new preventative care option for people living with neuropathy and diabetic foot ulcers, both complications of diabetes. Without proper care, these conditions progress to deteriorating conditions like Charcot, or even worse, amputation of the affected limb.

Research shows that temperature monitoring in conjunction with regular visual exams can improve outcomes related to diabetic foot ulcers.(1) Temperature monitoring is the gold standard for diabetic foot care.

Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcers with Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM)

Adopting strategies to prevent foot complications plays an increasingly important role in the management of patients with diabetes. The rapid expansion of remote patient monitoring opens the door for many physicians to introduce crucial limb-saving preventative care options.

“Preventing ulcers is very important in diabetic patients. Poorly healing ulcers, infected ulcers, and ulcers with poor circulation can lead to limb amputation,” says Dr. Puja Uppal, board-certified physician. “Many times ulcers may not hurt because the patient has loss of feeling due to neuropathy or vascular disease; thus, the patient might not be aware of a growing infection from an ulcer until it may be too late.”

“The prevention of ulcers in patients with diabetes is crucial because it prevents the onslaught of a host of other potentially serious health problems,” says Dr. Beverly Yates ND, an internationally acclaimed diabetes expert. “Ulcers in the feet of a diabetic can lead to gangrene and loss of the affected limb or infections that can become systemic (an infection that starts at the area of ulceration can spread from being local in the foot to the whole body, i.e. starting in a bone in the affected foot).”

In order to reduce costs and prevent poor patient outcomes, healthcare practitioners are quickly turning to Siren Socks’ remote temperature monitoring to help people with diabetes avoid foot ulcers and amputations.

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Recognizing Inflammation Promptly

Inflammation is one of the first signs of an ulcer, which can be recognized early by identifying increased temperature to localized areas on the feet. Siren Socks are designed to improve patient outcomes related to diabetic foot ulcers and other diabetes complications.

This wearable device is embedded with micro-sensors that recognize temperature changes in the feet, offering rapid detection of inflammation and injury. Through Siren’s unique RPM platform, trained nurses can swiftly coordinate care with the patient’s doctor, improving the outcomes for many suffering from diabetic foot complications.

Patients wear their Siren Socks daily, which measure foot temperature at six locations to determine if inflammation occurs. When foot temperature goes up, this indicates early signs of inflammation and a licensed nurse calls the patient to check on any symptoms and maybe ask for photos. This is a crucial tool in ensuring patients with neuropathy receive guidance at the first signs of an ulcer—before it leads to more serious complications or amputation.

Clinical Results of Siren Socks

According to a study conducted by Dr. David G. Armstrong, professor of clinical surgery at Keck School of Medicine of USC, “skin temperature monitoring reduces the risk for diabetic foot ulceration in high-risk patients”.

This study looked at the data from 225 participants with diabetes who were at high risk for ulcerations. Each participant was assigned to one of two treatment groups, one of which used infrared temperature scans to check foot temperature. Over the course of this 18-month study, participants were monitored for a foot temperature difference greater than 4 degrees Fahrenheit. The results concluded that “High temperature gradients between feet may predict the onset of neuropathic ulceration and self-monitoring may reduce the risk of ulceration.” This clinical evidence sheds light on a new preventative approach that can substantially improve patient outcomes.

Temperature Monitoring: The New Gold Standard

Research demonstrates that temperature monitoring is a breakthrough diagnostic technology that can prevent ulcers from forming. The guidelines established by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot for foot ulcer prevention acknowledge that temperature monitoring can reduce and prevent the occurrence of ulcers in diabetic patients. Through prompt diagnosis and treatment, we can begin to take the necessary steps to prevent these ulcers from progressing into infection.

Managing diabetes and avoiding foot ulcers can be complex and requires daily care and maintenance from the patient. Remote patient monitoring with Siren Socks can help simplify the life of these patients while reducing the risk for diabetes-related infection that may lead to amputation. With remote patient monitoring (RPM), clinicians can track and treat diabetic foot ulcers at the onset — while relieving some of the burden to the patient. Through proper patient education and guidance, providers can improve patient compliance and create a more efficient system for the prevention and management of diabetic foot complications.

For some, RPM with Siren Socks can help ensure your diabetes and neuropathy are controlled. Siren Socks track your foot temperature and recognize inflammation at the onset. Trained nurses continuously monitor this data and coordinate care with your doctor when signs of inflammation or injury are detected. This reduces the risk of long-term injury associated with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and Charcot.

Interested in learning more about Siren Socks?

Siren Socks help patients and doctors find early signs of potential diabetic foot ulcers. Don’t take our word for it. Talk to your doctor about prescribing Siren Socks today!

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Siren Nurse Spotlight – Inglish Lloyd, LPN

May 6, 2021

Inglish Lloyd has been a Licensed Practical Nurse for five years and prior to becoming a nurse, she was in the healthcare field as a Certified Nurse’s Assistant for fifteen years. She received her nursing education in Philadelphia Pennsylvania and was born and raised in Wilmington Delaware. She currently resides in Valdosta, GA. Inglish’s nursing background includes Behavioral Health, Wound Care, Pediatric Home Health, Long-Term Care, Health and Wellness Coaching and Chronic Care Case Management. She truly has a passion for providing quality care and education to all populations. She believes that proper education is essential in prevention and the healing process. Inglish loves spending time with her family, going to the beach and roller skating.

"It's great to know that our patients really understand the value of Siren Socks and how our socks serve as a preventative measure. The amazing part is, all that our patients have to do is put the socks on daily. Nurses and providers work as a team to handle the rest. I'm so proud to be part of the Siren Care team!"

Inglish LloydI adds, "I think that prevention is so important. Being a nurse that has worked with every population and in every area of nursing, i feel like preventing disease and infection is so crucial. That's what Siren Socks do. Our patients only need to wear socks in order for a whole team of devoted nurses and staff to monitor and to deliver quality care. Our patients get so excited and many have told me that they feel like a VIP to have their own private nurse looking out for their foot health. I believe that caring for my patients and receiving their feedback is the most rewarding part of my job."

About Siren Socks

Siren Socks are innovative smart socks that detect potential issues with your feet. Siren Socks are an FDA-registered Class I medical device and are for people with neuropathy.

The socks measure your foot temperature. Temperature monitoring has been shown to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers in multiple clinical studies clinical studies over the past 20 years and is considered the gold standard in diabetic foot care.

The information from the socks is monitored by licensed nurses who contact you regularly to check on your health and the status of your feet. Your doctor review any issues that arise and determine if a clinic visit is necessary.

Siren Socks are covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and many private insurance plans.

Interested patients can find a Siren-Certified Provider near them and begin the enrollment process by clicking here.

Newsletter